Scottish Country Dancing Dictionary

Deuks Dang Ower My Daddie

Scottish Poem By Robert Burns

Deuks Dang Ower My Daddie is a Scottish poem written by Robert Burns in 1792.

This Poem was also called The Bairns Gat Out and appeared in many collections of Robert Burns, who based his poem on an older, traditional song thought to be too rude for modern ears.


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Deuks Dang Ower My Daddie

Deuks Dang Ower My Daddie By Robert Burns

The bairns gat out wi' an unco shout,
The deuks dang o'er my daddie, O!
The fien-ma-care, quo' the feirrie auld wife,
He was but a paidlin' body, O!
He paidles out, and he paidles in,
rn' he paidles late and early, O!
This seven lang years I hae lien by his side,
An' he is but a fusionless carlie, O.

O haud your tongue, my feirrie auld wife,
O haud your tongue, now Nansie, O:
I've seen the day, and sae hae ye,
Ye wad na ben sae donsie, O.
I've seen the day ye butter'd my brose,
And cuddl'd me late and early, O;
But downa-do's come o'er me now,
And oh, I find it sairly, O!


Deuks Dang Ower From The Book of Scottish Song (1843) Edited By Alexander Whitelaw

The first two stanzas of this song were manufactured by Burns from an old but somewhat licentious ditty called "The deuks dang o'er my daddie." (above)

The two additional concluding verses are by Dr. Graham of Glasgow. The tune's old, and can be traced at least as far back as Playford's "Dancing Master," 1657.

The bairns gat out wi' an unco shout,
The deuks dang o'er my daddie, O;
Quo' our gudewife, "Let him lie there,
For he's just a paidling body, O;
He paidles out, and he paidles in.
He paidles late and early, O;
This thirty years I ha'e been his wife.
And comfort comes but sparely, O."

"Now haud your tongue," quo' our gudeman,
"And dinna be sae saucy, O,
I've seen the day, and so ha'e ye,
I was baith young and gaucy, O.
I've seen the day you butter'd my brose.
And cuitered me late and early, O;
But auld age is on me now.
And wow but I fin't richt sairly. O."

"I carena though ye were i' the mools.
Or dookit in a boggie, O;
I kenna the use o' the crazy auld fool,
But just to toom the coggie, O.
Gin the win' were out o' your whaisling hauzt
I'd marry again and be voggie, O;
Some bonnie young lad would be my lot.
Some rosy cheeked roggie, O."

Quo' our gudeman, " Gi'e me that rung
That's hingin' in the ingle, O;
I'se gar ye haud that sorrowfu' tongue,
Or else your lugs will tingle, O.
Gang to your bed this blessed nicht.
Or I'll be your undoing, O;"
The cannie auld wife crap out o' sicht, -
What think ye o' sic wooing, O."


Deuks Dang Ower My Daddie Song Video

Deuks Dang Ower My Daddie Song - Information Video
Deuks Dang Ower Song Image
Deuks Dang Ower From The Book of Scottish Song, 1843


The Online Scots Dictionary Translate Scots To English.
Published in http://www.robertburns.org/works/373.shtml
Dance Information licensed under this Creative Commons Licence.
Text from this original The Deuks Dang Ower article on Wikisource.
Image Copyright Alexander Whitelaw [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.

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