Scottish Country Dancing Dictionary

There's Nae Luck Aboot The House

Scottish Song By Jean Adam

There's Nae Luck Aboot The House is a Scottish song written by Jean Adam (1704-1765), first appearing on the streets in around 1770's.

The authorship is questionable since a copy of the song appeared among the papers of William Julius Mickle, the translator of the Lusiad, although since Mickle did not include it in his own works there has been some plausable argument to show that it must have been the work of Jean Adam, who kept a school at Crawford's Dyke, Greenock.

Jean Adam was born in Greenock into a maritime family and was orphaned at a young age. Her most famous work is thought to be "There's Nae Luck Aboot The Hoose," a tale of a sailor's wife and the safe return of her husband from the sea.

It is reported that Robert Burns remarked on its quality in 1771, some years after Adam's death.


Related Scottish Country Dances

There's Nae Luck Aboot The Hoose

There's Nae Luck Aboot The House By Jean Adam

And are ye sure the news is true?
And are ye sure he's weel?
Is this a time to talk o' wark?
Ye jades, fling by your wheel!
Is this a time to think o' wark,
When Colin's at the door?
Gie me my cloak! I'll to the quay,
And see him come ashore.

Chorus
For there's nae luck about the house,
There's nae luck ava';
There's little pleasure in the house,
When our gudeman's awa'.

Rise up, and mak a clean fire-side,
Put on the muckle pot;
Gie little Kate her cotton gown,
And Jock his Sunday coat;
And make their shoon as black as slaes,
Their hose as white as snaw;
It's a' to please my ain gudeman,
He likes to see them braw.

Chorus

There are twa hens upon the bauk,
'Been fed this month and mair,
Make haste and thraw their necks about,
That Colin weel may fare;
And spread the table neat and clean,
Gar ilka thing look braw;
It's a' to pleasure our gudeman,
For he's been lang awa'.

Chorus

Come gie me down my bigonets,
My bishop-satin gown;
And rin and tell the Bailie's wife
That Colin's come to town;
My Sunday sheen they maun gae on,
My hose o' pearl blue,
It's a' to please my ain gudeman,
For he's baith leal and true.

Chorus

Sae true his words, sae smooth his speech,
His breath like caller air,
His very foot has music in't,
When he comes up the stair:
And will I see his face again?
And will I hear him speak?
I'm downright dizzie wi' the thought,
In troth I'm like to greet!

Chorus

The cauld blasts o' the winter wind,
That thrilled through my heart.
They're a' blawn by; I hae him safe,
'Till death we'll never part;
But what puts parting in my mind?
It may be far awa;
The present moment is our ain.
The niest we never saw!

Chorus

Since Colin's weel, I'm weel content,
I hae nae mair to crave;
Could I but live to make him blest,
I'm blest aboon the lave;
And will I see his face again?
And will I hear him speak?
I'm downright dizzie wi' the thought,
In troth I'm like to greet!


There's Nae Luck Aboot The House Song Video

There's Nae Luck Aboot The House Song - Information Video
There's Nae Luck Aboot The House Image
There's Nae Luck Aboot The House, From Garland Of Scotia, Printed Music, c. 1841


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